In the Spotlight: 269 – Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Post 552

Where the first three ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ movies were filmed, massively boosting tourism. Home to over 200 species of fish. Famed for its breadfruit, the first country in the Caribbean where it was grown, brought to the island in 1793 by William ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’ Bligh. The capital city, Kingstown, is known as ‘The City of Arches’ because it has over 400 arches. The city also has a botanical gardens. Founded in 1765, it is the third oldest botanical gardens in the western hemisphere. And the country was the winner of the prestigious ‘Best Honeymoon Island of the Year Award’ in 2008. Ooh. Today, we’re in The Breadfruit Isle, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is a country in the Caribbean made up of 32 islands, surrounded by the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It is the 203rd largest country at 150 square miles, with the 196th largest population of any country with 109,000 people. The motto is ‘Pax et Justitia’, which is Latin for ‘Peace and Justice’. The blue colour on the flag represents the tropical sky and the crystal waters, the yellow for the golden sands and the green for the lush vegetation. The diamonds are low on the flag to represent the position of the country in the Antilles. They also represent the islands as ‘gems’ and form a ‘V’ for Vincent.

Vincentians are generous, strong and kind-hearted people. They like their sport and love to sing and dance. They also like storytelling, have strong beliefs and love nature. Their culture is rich and full of zest.

The islands that make up the country are volcanic and rarely flat. Some of the landscape is quite rocky and steep, whereas other parts are rather sandier and have a number of gorgeous bays. It’s a verdant and quiet paradise.

There are sights to see such as the stunning oasis that is Baleine Falls. It was badly damaged by one of the many hurricanes that bombard the island, but that has not stripped it of its glorious natural allure nor has it tempered its succulent mirable nature, this hidden, remote and unknown slice of Eden. Then there’s La Soufrière, a volcano and the highest point on the islands with an elevation of just over 4,000 feet. It is ethereally stunning, a piece of art that radically alters with even the slightest change in one’s position. Its aggression is raimentless yet its appearance is charming, surrounded by a delightful ocean of green. And then you have the Vermont Nature Trail. From which one can see truly empyrean vistas, the multilayered canopy of tens of species of trees and plants, framed so amazingly by the hills and mountains in the background. It’s a dream of prelapsarian design.

I think the best sight of this wonderful country is Saint George’s Cathedral in the capital, Kingstown. It’s perfect, really. It’s calm and serene. There are flashes of colour nestled among a quieter palette of greens. And standing out like a gleaming white gem is this small cathedral, with the tall green hills the backdrop. It’s quintessentially Caribbean. I can barely describe it – it really is one of the most beautiful scenes I’ve ever seen. A supernaculum traditionally designed marvel, built in 1820, its beauty incicurable. It’s such a shame it’s falling to pieces and is in desperate need of donations to help bring it back to its former glory. But even considering that, it’s still a breathtaking and majestic icon.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The country of peace, kindness and honeymoons.

Toodle-pip :)(:


Images: 1) The flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (credit: wikimedia.org), 2) Saint George’s Cathedral (credit: panoramio.com), 3) La Soufrière in the background (credit: negronews.fr)


Please feel free check out the latest posts from my other two blogs:

The Indelible Life of Me
New Post Every Sunday
Click Here to Read the Latest Post

Hark Around the Words
New Posts Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Click Here to Read the Latest Post


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